Archive for Thursday, September 22, 2005

7 grades meet state testing goals

September 22, 2005, 12:00 a.m.

Updated: September 22, 2005, 2:34 p.m.

Seven out of 12 grades taking the state assessment in Lansing school district this spring achieved the Building Standard of Excellence.

The building standard of excellence is based on benchmarks set by the Kansas State Board of Education, said Lansing schools assistant superintendent Donna Hughes. To reach the standard, a certain percentage of students taking each exam - math, reading, science and social studies - must fall into categories of basic, proficient, advanced and exemplary. Schools also must have less than the maximum allowable percentage of students in the unsatisfactory category to meet the standard. The numbers vary for each grade and subject.

The standard of excellence is "something that the state does as recognition" for schools that are performing well on state assessments, Hughes said. For Lansing schools that attain the standard, Hughes said the district office provides a banner for the building to display.

There are no consequences from the state for not meeting the standard, Hughes said - however, teachers and administrators at schools not meeting the standard are re-assessing curricula in order to improve scores in the future.

Meeting the standard were students tested in fourth-grade math and science, sixth-grade social studies, seventh-grade math and science and eighth-grade reading and social studies. Students tested in fifth-grade reading, 10th-grade math and science and 11th-grade reading and social studies did not reach the standard.

Lansing Intermediate School principal Jan Jorgensen said her teachers would receive "a lot of staff development in those areas" where students did not meet the standard. She said the school has hired a speaker to come in October and November to help teachers improve their curricula.

Lansing High School principal Steve Dike said although no grades in his building that took the assessment achieved the standard, "test scores across the board were up." He said the school is implementing pre-assessments to determine which students are in need of tutoring in each subject to be tested. The pre-assessments are exams from past years and are given to freshmen, sophomores and juniors, he said. Those students took pre-assessments this week.

Hughes said the same tests are used to determine the building standard of excellence and Adequate Yearly Progress, or AYP. The federal government determines compliance with No Child Left Behind standards based on AYP, Hughes said. The state board of education also uses AYP to determine schools' accreditation status.

All Lansing schools' test scores were "way above (minimum percentages for) AYP," Hughes said. Hughes reported AYP results at the Lansing school board's last meeting Sept. 12.

How they fared

In Lansing school district, 12 grades took state assessments in four areas last spring - reading, math, science and social studies. In order to achieve the Building Standard of Excellence in an area, the number of students in each category must meet the state's minimum or maximum allowable percentage. Here are the results by subject, with a summary of what the numbers mean.

READING

Grade: Fifth

Met the standard: No

The breakdown:

¢ 8.7 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 5 percent in this category

¢ 91.3 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 95 percent

¢ 66.7 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 80 percent

¢ 38.9 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 60 percent

¢ 12.7 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 25 percent

Summary: Fifth-graders tested in reading fell well below the standards set by the state.

¢¢¢

Grade: Eighth

Met the standard: Yes

The breakdown:

¢ No students tested fell into the unsatisfactory category; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 10 percent

¢ 100 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 90 percent

¢ 96.4 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 75 percent

¢ 76.4 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 55 percent

¢ 30.3 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 20 percent

Summary: Eighth-graders tested in reading far exceeded the state's standard.

¢¢¢

Grade: 11th

Met the standard: No

The breakdown:

¢ 7.8 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 10 percent

¢ 92.1 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 90 percent

¢ 64 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 70 percent

¢ 35.9 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 50 percent

¢ 9.6 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 15 percent

Summary: In 2004, 11th-graders tested in reading achieved the standard for the first time; this year, performance was down. While most students achieved at least a basic skill level, not enough students performed at higher levels of proficient, advanced and exemplary to meet the state's standard.

MATH

Grade: Fourth

Met the standard: Yes

The breakdown:

¢ 0.7 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 5 percent

¢ 99.3 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 95 percent

¢ 94.4 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 80 percent

¢ 79.6 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 60 percent

¢ 47.2 percent were al level exemplary; minimum is 25 percent

Summary: Of the fourth-graders tested in math, only seven tested at level basic, and just one at unsatisfactory. Students far exceeded the state standard.

¢¢¢

Grade: Seventh

Met the standard: Yes

The breakdown:

¢ 1.3 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 10 percent

¢ 98.7 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 90 percent

¢ 87.6 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 80 percent

¢ 71.9 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 60 percent

¢ 42.5 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 25 percent

Summary: Seventh-graders tested in math far surpassed the state standard.

¢¢¢

Grade: 10th

Met the standard: No

The breakdown:

¢ 11.7 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 15 percent

¢ 88.3 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 85 percent

¢ 59.5 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 70 percent

¢ 38.6 percent were at least level advanced: minimum is 40 percent

¢ 18.4 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 15 percent

Summary: Although Lansing 10th-graders tested in math had met the standard in 2003 and 2004, not enough students tested in 2005 attained proficient and advanced levels to meet the standard.

SCIENCE

Grade: Fourth

Met the standard: Yes

The breakdown:

¢ 2.1 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 5 percent

¢ 98 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 95 percent

¢ 89.6 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 80 percent

¢ 72.1 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 65 percent

¢ 34.3 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 25 percent

Summary: Fourth-graders tested in science exceeded the state's goals, earning the Building Standard of Excellence for the first time.

¢¢¢

Grade: Seventh

Met the standard: Yes

The breakdown:

¢ 0.6 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 10 percent

¢ 99.3 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 90 percent

¢ 87.3 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 80 percent

¢ 71.5 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 60 percent

¢ 39.9 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 25 percent

Summary: With only one student testing at the unsatisfactory level in science, seventh-graders surpassed the standard for the first time in science.

¢¢¢

Grade: 10th

Met the standard: No

The breakdown:

¢ 10.1 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 10 percent

¢ 89.9 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 90 percent

¢ 75.1 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 70 percent

¢ 51.4 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 51.4 percent

¢ 25.4 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 15 percent

Summary: Tenth-graders tested in science missed achieving the standard by a margin of one student.

SOCIAL STUDIES

Grade: Sixth

Met the standard: Yes

The breakdown:

¢ No students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 5 percent

¢ 100 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 95 percent

¢ 94.2 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 85 percent

¢ 78.6 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 65 percent

¢ 47.4 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 25 percent

Summary: Sixth-graders tested in social studies not only met the standard but passed it and never looked back.

¢¢¢

Grade: Eighth

Met the standard: Yes

The breakdown:

¢ 0.6 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 10 percent

¢ 99.4 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 90 percent

¢ 91.1 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 80 percent

¢ 77.4 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 65 percent

¢ 42.9 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 25 percent

Summary: With only one student testing out at an unsatisfactory level, eighth-graders easily surpassed the standard.

¢¢¢

Grade: 11th

Met the standard: No

The breakdown:

¢ 6.1 percent of students tested were at level unsatisfactory; maximum allowance to meet the standard is 10 percent

¢ 93.9 percent were at least level basic; minimum to meet the standard is 90 percent

¢ 78.7 percent were at least level proficient; minimum is 70 percent

¢ 50 percent were at least level advanced; minimum is 50 percent

¢ 17.7 percent were at level exemplary; minimum is 20 percent

Summary: With just four more students testing at an exemplary level, 11th-graders could have met the standard in social studies.

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