Archive for Thursday, February 19, 2009

5 Questions: Happy Birthday, Abe

Museum remembers, celebrates Lincoln

Chuck Wilderson poses as Abraham Lincoln Feb. 12 at the Basehor Historical Museum. Author Carol Ayres and community members gathered at the museum to celebrate Lincoln’s 200th birthday.

Chuck Wilderson poses as Abraham Lincoln Feb. 12 at the Basehor Historical Museum. Author Carol Ayres and community members gathered at the museum to celebrate Lincoln’s 200th birthday.

February 19, 2009

Q: How long have you been playing Abraham Lincoln?

A: Oh, a number of years. I’ve done different functions here and there. Never anything too big, but I sometimes get asked to be him a local events every now and then.

Q: Where else have you donned Lincoln attire?

A: The Gold Pride group does skits, and I’ve played Lincoln there a few times as part of a skit. Also, in Liberal, I was dressed as Lincoln during a parade. That’s where I got my hat that I have on today. Some of the people in the parade made it for me.

Q: Did you do any research before playing the part?

A: Yes, I did some. I’ve been reading pamphlets and brochures about him that I got from the museum. I’m currently reading this book called “Lincoln’s Virtues.” It’s a very good book. But from those pamplets and books, I learn more about Lincoln and what people thought of him and how I should play him.

Q: What is your favorite part of portraying Abraham Lincoln?

A: I think it’s the historic value of it, of representing his greatness as a man. He rose from nothing. He didn’t go to formal school, but he read all the time, and he eventually became a lawyer, a politician, a President all on his own. He’s really someone to look up to. He’s an example of what people can really do.

Q: What would you like everyone to know about our 16th president?

A: Well, that’s hard because he had a lot of outstanding characteristics. He fought to preserve the union. That was his mission. His real purpose was to create a democracy, and he had the will and the determination to see it through. That’s something to admire and remember about him. He saved the nation.

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